Clean Out Your Closet in 5 Simple Steps

Clean Out Your Closet in 5 Simple StepsYou probably begin each new season assessing your wardrobe, seeking clothes from your collection that match the shifting climate. It’s in this moment that many of us become overwhelmed, discovering just how badly our closets have fallen into disarray. In the spirit of spring cleaning, it’s time to clear out the closet and wrestle for some control!

It may seem daunting, but organizing the closet takes just a little bit of time for a long-term reward: no more shifting through mountains of laundry and drawers full of accessories. Think of all the time you could save preparing for the day—and the clear state of mind you’ll get when viewing a neat, organized wardrobe. 


1) Start with a Purge
Before you do anything, clear your closet by removing out-of-season clothes or things you think you’ll never wear again. This makes the overall process of re-organizing much easier, and frees up space for stuff you intend to wear and use.

You should donate, gift or sell clothes that won’t be worn. As for out-of-season clothing, find other places to stash it out of sight, out of mind. Storage bins under the bed are great for stowing away stuff you won’t use for months. You may also hide rarely-used clothes throughout the house in furniture that doubles as storage chests—for example, our Elana bench, available in a handful of colours.


2) Keeping Must-Haves on Hand Easily
When organizing your closet, keep this rule in mind: most-used articles should be at eye level, with less-used below and least-used high. This system lets you pick an outfit faster.

Consider upgrading your hangers as well; good hangers are essential for the long-term care of your favorite clothes. A coordinated set instantly makes a closet look neater and more organized. Our non-slip wood hangers feature an elegant design to keep your clothes in shape (we also have pants and skirt hangers with a matching wooden finish). Want to double up on hanger space? Take a tab from a soda can and thread it through the hanger—you can hang a second one through the tab’s other hole.


3) Maximize Real Estate by Going Vertical
Don’t stash everything on shelves and hangers; go vertical to optimize space! Keep folded clothes and accessories in a stack of drawers or two. Clear drawers work best for accessories, since you can see what’s inside before rummaging through.

Vertical organizers also let you save space storing shoes and other accessories. The Aldo boot/accessory organizer features cubby holes of various sizes, making it a versatile solution to your closet storage needs. The pockets found on the sides keep odds and ends handy for quick retrieval.


4) Keep Everything Grouped & Labeled
It’s easy to group like things together in drawers and cubby holes, but you’ll want to keep things organized on shelving, too. After grouping accessories or clothes together, use labels to keep everything identified—and to designate space for everything next time you restock your closet on laundry day. Bormioli vintage adhesive labels provide a cute way to keep your wardrobe neat and uncluttered.


5) Keep it Fun
If your closet is especially large (or if you’ve turned a spare room into a closet in lieu of a real one), add some fun furnishings to fully utilize the space. Turning your closet into a bonified dressing room might encourage you to keep it tidier—and with the extra space you’ll make after organizing, why not?

Try out all your favorite fashions in front of a full mirror, such as this beautifully crafted wooden framed one. And with a stool or accent chair, you can easily take on and off different shoes while planning outfits. The accent arm chair comes in neutral tones and a condensed shape that should work for reasonably spacious walk-in closets.



author

Joe Sutton

Joe is a freelance writer and poet. A total homebody with a love for design, he loves brainstorming ways to transform a space. When not writing or tending to his bonsai, he’s probably decorating in The Sims. You can find him on Twitter at @joesutton.

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